Why subscribe?

Welcome!

Do you love music? 🎶 Yeah!

What about memoir? ✍️ That too!

Have you ever noticed that sometimes the perfect song seems to come on 🔀 to soundtrack what’s going on in your life almost supernaturally ✨???

Yes?! OK, then this Substack is for you!

I Shuffle 🔀 my Spotify Liked Songs playlist (55,000+ and counting) every so often, then write ✍️ how the song 🎶 seems to Synchronize1 ✨ with my life.

You’ll see, it’s kind of crazy 🤪!

I think you’ll like it because you’ll learn about new music or remember old favorites; get a vibe about how their lyrics or sounds speak to what’s going on with me personally, kind of like a serialized LiveJournal memoir mixed with the music blogs2 of the aughts; and maybe learn something helpful for your own journey!

Common themes include spirituality and psychology; love and relationships; family and friends; mental health and illness; books, movies, TV, and art; gender and sexuality; memes and the Internet; intellectual copyright law vs. freedom; The Enneagram, Numerology, Astrology and other esoterica; and lots of other music.

Also

The Substack is now including guest posts from the likes of:

Ray Padgett (Flagging Down the Double E's), Kiana Fitzgerald, Annie Rauwerda (@depthsofwikipedia), Rosecrans Baldwin (Meditations in an Emergency), Swarnali Mukherjee (Berkana), Joey Power, Alice Johnson Boher, Dimitri Karakostas (@theworstpoet), Jesse Meadows (Sluggish), Rachel Lang, Dan Marshall (Peter Pan Man Dan), Caroline Rothstein, My Godson’s Father, Surfboard C (Cornell Sanner), Bridey Elliott (Warty Roses), Jackson Bliss (MIXTAPE), Crash Barbosa, Rebecca Davey (Observables), Chris Cole, Scott Frey (Sub Pub), Jay Michaelson, Wayne Robins (Critical Conditions), Tim Dillinger (God’s Music Is My Life), Leon Langford, Kerem Sanga, Frederick Woodruff (WOODRUFF), Leryl Joseph, Andrew Womack, Jennifer Lee O’Brien (post emosh), Dave Dorsey, Darnell Lamont Walker, Shayna Goodman (Blow Up Your Life), Dave Hunter (The Whalespout), Christopher von Roy (The World According to von Roy), Barrington Smith-Seetachitt, Brian Dyko, Ethan Lipsitz, Melanie Zoey Weinstein (feral masochism), Paul Wilner, ?, Rollie Pemberton (Cadence Weapon), Ila Parvaz (URF Tone), Kellee Brewer Stall, Matt Chambless, Eli Enis (Endless Scroll), Sean O’Neill, Jesse Raub (Good Ones).

With more to come3

Check out the ongoing playlist to get a taste of the musical palate.

Read an interview with ‘me’ about the origin and purposes of the project.

And see what NPR said about it!

And you can now order your own Shufflemancy Reading via Etsy.

Shufflemancy: an Etsy Shop

Who Writes This?

‘Me’ Dave Cowen.

Dave Cowen

photo by Kerem Sanga

Published in The New Yorker and McSweeney's now mostly a DIY writer with self-published books featured in The New York Times.

Also ‘Not-Me’4 ;)

What Do I Have To Pay For It?

All posts are free5 and arrive at about 5:55 PM Pacific.

But, if you can, consider subscribing to a paid option to financially support the work.

And also keep it in the top Music as well as Faith and Spirituality as well as Humor Substack categories so it’s more ‘Discoverable’.

Or tip what you can via Venmo @Dave-Cowen

🔀✍️ 🎶✨🤪

To find out more about the company that provides the tech for this newsletter, visit Substack.com.

1

Psychoanalyst Carl Jung popularized a meaning of the term ‘Synchronicity’ as the coming together of inner and outer events in a way that cannot be explained by cause and effect and that is meaningful to the observer.

2

This isn’t traditional music criticism. There are no ratings or rankings, not even ‘liking’ or ‘disliking’, all songs are ‘good’ and fertile fodder for whatever feels called to be written.

3

If you’re interested in guest posting, please email me at shufflesynchronicities@gmail.com. Anyone is welcome, not just ‘writers.’ And there’s even a small payment ;)

4

As Lewis Hyde writes in his book The Gift: “We are lightened when our gifts rise from pools we cannot fathom. Then we know they are not a solitary egotism and they are inexhaustible.”

5

As Hyde also writes: “The more we allow commodity art to define and control our gifts, the less gifted we will become, as individuals and as a society.”